Comix

A 40-minute motion comic of Dan Hipp’s Gyakushu!

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Dan Hipp is an American who create truly respectable Japanese-style manga.

Now, Gyakush!, Hipp’s tale of revenge and death and murder and cold unhappiness has been made into a motion comic. And it’s pretty cool.

The voice-acting is so-so, but the art work, sound effects, and incorporation of motion are fantastic. This is a smooth and fun to watch non-comic comic and non-animation animation.

The story is fun, too — except for one major and at times unbearable flaw. Hipp can’t seem to let the story tell itself. He uses a narrator constantly living in the meta — telling the viewer what the story is about. It’s like he never learned the most basic tenet of fiction writing: show, don’t tell.

Here’s how my post would read if it Hipp’s obnoxious narrator were writing it:

Dear reader, this post is about a comic that is both bad and good, worth reading and a waste of time. Still following? We can assume so. You seem to be a clever one. But I shouldn’t talk so much. You must read the post by yourself to understand. I am about to show you the post. Are you ready? Can you handle it? Here is the post:

Gyakushu! isn’t like most Tokyopop manga — it’s not a Japanese import. Dan Hipp is an American who create truly respectable Japanese-style manga,

Now, Hipp’s tale of revenge and death and murder and cold unhappiness has been made into a motion comic. And it’s pretty cool.

The voice-acting is so-so, but the art work, sound effects, and incorporation of motion are fantastic. This is a smooth and fun to watch non-comic comic and non-animation animation.

Do you see how it is both good and bad? A waste of time and worth reading? No? Well be patient. You’ll understand soon.

The story is fun, too — except for one major and at times unbearable flaw. Hipp can’t seem to let the story tell itself. He uses a narrator constantly living in the meta — telling the viewer what the story is about.

The worst part is really how much is lost through the use of the meta-narrator. This could be an amazing story — instead it’s just awesome, mixed with lots of painful.

That being said, I still highly recommend watching the above video. It’s worth it.

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